IB - International Baccalaureate

Welcome to the IB programme

The IB Diploma gives access to universities and other education institutions in more than 100 countries around the world. 

The rigorous and demanding course is highly respected, not only because of the high academic level, but also because of the emphasis on the personal and social development of the students, which is strengthened- among other things – by the CAS Programme.

Struer Statsgymnasium mission statement

Struer Statsgymnasium would like to be known as a challenging and stimulating high school with the central ambition that students should learn more than they think they would ever need in life.

Our aim is to be a unique regional offer with a wide range of youth educations in an international campus environment. Struer Statsgymnasium and boarding school must be the natural choice for the local youth and an interesting offer for international students, the core task being every single student’s education, learning and cultural formation. We aim to prepare students for higher education and for our students to become compassionate, brave, and curious citizens of the 21st century. We want our students to become the entrepreneurs of tomorrow, to become active citizens, and to become competent professionals and problem solvers. We will solve this task through the broad educational offer ranging from our Danish national curriculum programmes to our International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme by virtue of a dynamic and open learning environment and through various collaborations, locally, nationally, and internationally.

Welcome as a student here at Struer Statsgymnasium.

If you have any further questions please do not hesitate to call or write.

IB Coordinator | Morten R. Jensen | Phone:  +45 3035 2593 | Mail: mrj@stgym.dk

How and What

How to apply

Data protection

The IB diploma

Calendar

Boarding school

Subjects

B S Ambassadors

Rules at ssg

IB diploma staff

Subjects

Click on the individual subjects to learn more about their courses

Studies in language and literature

Danish HL/SL
English HL/SL
Language Self-Taught SL

Sciences

Biology HL/SL
Chemistry HL/SL
Physics HL/SL
Sports, exercise and health science SL

Language acquisition

English B HL
Danish B HL
German B HL/SL
Spanish a.i. SL

Mathematics

Analysis and Approaches HL/SL
Applications and Interpretation SL
TOK - Theory of Knowledge

Individuals and society

History HL/SL
Business and management HL/SL
Psychology SL

Visual arts

VA

Testimonials

“I always wanted to be a part of an international environment that would help me improve my English. I think the IB Diploma will give me more opportunities than a normal school would for my future.”

– Bill

“I enrolled in the IB programme not only for its challenging programme characteristics, but also because it allows you to improve yourself academically as well as personally, and will leave you prepared for the challenges of further educations.”

– Richard

“I came to do IB at Struer Statsgymnasium so I could be surrounded by different cultures in a new country.”

– Xena

Struer Statsgymnasium Introduction to the IBO Grading System 

Performance in each subject is graded on a scale of 1 point (minimum) to 7 points (maximum).
• For the IB diploma, a maximum of 3 points is awarded for combined performance in TOK and the extended essay.
• The maximum total Diploma Programme points score is 45.
• Approx. 20 % of the assessment is internally assessed and moderated by the IBO
• The written exams make up the last 80 % of the assessment
• All written exams are usually taken by the end of the two years
• The Diploma will be awarded to a candidate who has a minimum of 24 points and has fulfilled the CAS requirements.
• Furthermore, the candidate has to have fulfilled the requirements for Theory of Knowledge (1 essay of 1200 – 1500 words) & the Extended Essay (4000 words, 40 hours of work). The TOK and the EE contribute with a maximum of 3 points to the total score. For further information regarding the EE, please refer to the EE folder.
• For further conditions regarding the award of the Diploma, please refer to the last page of this folder.

The IBO 7 grades

Grade 7: Excellent performance The student demonstrates a thorough knowledge and understanding of   the syllabus
Grade 6: Very good performance The student demonstrates a broad knowledge and understanding of the syllabus
Grade 5: Good performance The student demonstrates a good knowledge and understanding of the syllabus
Grade 4: Satisfactory performance The student demonstrates a satisfactory knowledge and understanding of the syllabus
Grade 3: Mediocre performance The student demonstrates partial knowledge and understanding of the syllabus
Grade 2: Poor performance The student demonstrates limited knowledge and understanding of the syllabus
Grade 1: Very poor performance The student demonstrates minimal knowledge and understanding of the syllabus

Award of the IB Diploma From the May 2015 session the following failing conditions apply:

  1. CAS requirements have not been met.
  2. Candidate’s total points are fewer than 24.
  3. An N has been given for theory of knowledge, Extended Essay or for a contributing subject.
  4. A grade E has been awarded for one or both of theory of knowledge and the Extended Essay.
  5. There is a grade 1 awarded in a subject/level.
  6. Grade 2 has been awarded three or more times (HL or SL).
  7. Grade 3 or below has been awarded four or more times (HL or SL).
  8. Candidate has gained fewer than 12 points on HL subjects (for candidates who register for four HL subjects, the three highest grades count).
  9. Candidate has gained fewer than 9 points on SL subjects (candidates who register for two SL subjects must gain at least 5 points at SL).Theory of Knowledge/Extended Essay Matrix The following matrix will be adopted from the May 2015 session.
TOK/ EE
A
B
C
D
E

Failing condition

A
3322
B
3221
C
2210
D
2100
E
Failing condition

The International Baccalaureate’s Mission Statement

The International Baccalaureate aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect. To this end the organization works with schools, governments, and international organizations to develop challenging programmes of international education and rigorous assessment.

These programmes encourage students across the world to become active, compassionate, and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences, can also be right.

The Learner Profile Inquirers We nurture our curiosity, developing skills for inquiry and research. We know how to learn independently and with others. We learn with enthusiasm and sustain our love of learning throughout life. Knowledgeable We develop and use conceptual understanding, exploring knowledge across a range of disciplines. We engage with issues and ideas that have local and global significance. Thinkers We use critical and creative thinking skills to analyse and take responsible ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY

The Learner Profile

Inquirers
We nurture our curiosity, developing skills for inquiry and research. We know how to learn independently and with others. We learn with enthusiasm and sustain our love of learning throughout life.

Knowledgeable
We develop and use conceptual understanding, exploring knowledge across a range of disciplines. We engage with issues and ideas that have local and global significance.

Thinkers

We use critical and creative thinking skills to analyse and take responsible action on complex problems. We exercise initiative in making reasoned, ethical decisions.

Communicators
We express ourselves confidently and creatively in more than one language and in many ways. We collaborate effectively, listening carefully to the perspectives of other individuals and groups.

Principled
We act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness and justice, and with respect for the dignity and rights of people everywhere. We take responsibility for our actions and their consequences.

Open-minded
We critically appreciate our own cultures and personal histories, as well as the values and traditions of others. We seek and evaluate a range of points of view, and we are willing to grow from the experience.

Caring
We show empathy, compassion, and respect. We have a commitment to service, and we act to make a positive difference in the lives of others and in the world around us.

Risk-takers
We approach uncertainty with forethought and determination; we work independently and cooperatively to explore new ideas and innovative strategies. We are resourceful and resilient in the face of challenge and change.

Balanced
We understand the importance of balancing different aspects of our lives – intellectual, physical and emotional – to achieve well-being for ourselves and others. We recognize our interdependence with other people and with the world in which we live.

Reflective
We thoughtfully consider the world and our own ideas and experience. We work to understand our strengths and weaknesses in order to support our learning and personal development.

ACADEMIC HONESTY: Philosophy and Practice

Academic honesty refers to:

  1. The full acknowledgement of the original authorship and ownership of creative material
  2. The production of ‘authentic’ pieces of work
  3. The protection of all forms of intellectual property – which include forms of intellectual and creative expression, as well as patents, registered designs, trademarks, moral rights and copyright
  4. Proper conduct in relation to the conduct of examinations

Struer Statsgymnasium, guided by the philosophy of the IB, places great value on personal integrity and academic honesty. Academic honesty is expected of all members of the school community, students, faculty, administration and parents. We are guided in our expectations and practices by two of the Learner Profile attributes which describe students as:

PRINCIPLED
We act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness and justice, and with respect for the dignity and rights of people everywhere. We take responsibility for our actions and their consequences.

REFLECTIVE
We thoughtfully consider the world and our own ideas and experience. We work to understand our strengths and weaknesses in order to support our learning and personal development.

It is the policy of Struer Statsgymnasium that:

 All Diploma Programme students understand the basic meaning and significance of academic honesty

 All work produced by Diploma Programme students is their own, authentic work

 All such authentic work has the ideas and words of others fully acknowledged

 Students understand and obey the rules relating to proper conduct of examinations

 Students understand the difference between collaboration and collusion, and that it is unacceptable to present work arrived at through a process of collusion

 This policy refers to all assignments set and completed in school or at home, ranging from basic pieces of homework to formal assessments required by the IB

The aim of this policy is to:

 Promote good academic practice and a school culture that actively encourages academic honesty.

 Enable students to understand what constitutes academic honesty and academic misconduct.

 Encourage students to look to their teachers, supervisors, the librarian, and the DP Coordinator for support when completing assessed work in order to prevent any possible form of misconduct.

 Ensure that students understand the importance of acknowledging accurately and honestly all ideas and work of others.

 Explain to students that they have an important role in ensuring that their work is ‘academically honest’.

 Impart to students that plagiarism (and all forms of academic misconduct) is a serious academic offence for which Struer Statsgymnasium imposes sanctions.

 Explain to students precisely what penalties will be imposed should they be found guilty of misconduct.

Academic Misconduct

What is Academic Misconduct?
Academic misconduct is defined as behavior, whether deliberate or inadvertent, that results in or may result in the candidate or any other candidate gaining an unfair advantage in one or more components.

Misconduct may include:

 Plagiarism: Plagiarism is passing off someone else’s work, writing, thoughts, visuals, graphics, music, and ideas as your own, inadvertently, or intentionally. Plagiarized work is work which fails to acknowledge the sources which it uses or upon which it is based. The use of translated materials, unless indicated and acknowledged, is also considered plagiarism. Plagiarism is a clear breach of academic honesty. It is also a criminal offence.

 Collusion: Supporting academic misconduct by another candidate – allowing one’s work to be copied or submitted for assessment by another (including the translation of non-English sources).

 Collaboration involves working together with other students. There are occasions where collaboration with other candidates is permitted or actively encouraged. Nevertheless, the final work must be produced independently, even though it may be based on similar data. This means that the introduction, content, conclusion, or summary of a piece of work must be written in each candidate’s own words and cannot therefore be the same as another candidates. Working together is collaboration. Copying someone else’s work is collusion. Even if you have ‘collaborated’ with another student, the work you present must be your own. Collusion is academic misconduct and will be penalized.

 Duplication of work: The presentation of the same work for different parts of the Diploma. (An example would involve submitting the same piece of work for a History Extended Essay and the History Internal Assessment)

Academic Misconduct also includes:

 Making up data for an assignment.

 Falsifying a CAS record.

 Taking unauthorized material into the examination room, including a mobile phone, an electronic device, wearable technology, smart watches or other form of smart technology, own rough paper, notes.

 Misbehaving during an exam, including any attempt to disrupt the examination or distract another candidate.

 Copying the work of another candidate.

 Referring to or attempting to refer to, unauthorized material that is related to the examination.

 Failing to comply with the instructions of the invigilator or other member of the school’s staff responsible for the conduct of an examination.

 Impersonating another candidate.

 Including offensive material in a script.

 Stealing examination papers.

 Disclosing or discussing the content of an examination paper with a person outside the immediate community within 24 hours after the examination.

 Using an unauthorized calculator during an examination.

 Concealing and/or using unauthorized software on a graphic calculator, particularly, but not only, during examinations.

 The unauthorized use of Google Translate and other translating tools.

Avoiding academic misconduct

How can I make sure that I am not plagiarizing material?

 The simplest method of avoiding plagiarism is to honestly, accurately and clearly acknowledge, by references in the body of your work, and in a bibliography at the end, each and every piece of material you used in the production of your work.

 All ideas and work of other persons, regardless of their source, must be acknowledged.

 Information located via email messages, web sites on the internet, social networks and any other electronic media must be treated in the same way as information found in books and journals.

 The sources of all photographs, maps, illustrations, computer programmes, data, graphs, audio-visual and similar material must be acknowledged.

 Passages that are quoted verbatim must be enclosed within quotation marks and references provided.

 All works of art, film, dance, music, theatre arts or visual arts must have their source/origin acknowledged.

 Always use Urkund in accordance with the school’s regulations.

 Material cannot be paraphrased without acknowledging the source.

Teachers and supervisors are free to request the use of a citation system appropriate to their particular subject discipline. The IB does not require the use of any particular citation system – there is however a clear expectation that all information will be fully and correctly referenced in a consistent manner, using a conventional system.

The Use of Urkund

Students are requested to submit the final version of all externally assessed work through Urkund before it is submitted to the IB. It is possible that the school may refuse to submit student work to the IB on the basis of a Urkund search outcome, or if a student refuses to submit the work through Urkund. Subject teachers may request that drafts of assignments be submitted through Urkund. Students should note that the IB also randomly submits work through various resources, thus creating an even larger data base through which student work can be compared. Urkund should not be seen only as a plagiarism detection device – rather, students should be encouraged to use it to learn and understand where and why citations are required.

Roles and Responsibilities

Students:

As students, your responsibilities in respect of academic honesty include the following:

 You are responsible for ensuring that all work submitted for assessment is authentically yours.

 You are responsible for fully and correctly acknowledging the work and ideas of others.

 You are expected to review your own work before submission for assessment to identify any passages, computer programmes, data, photographs and other material which require acknowledgement.

 You may be required to submit your work using Urkund. Failing or refusing to do this could result in an accusation of plagiarism, and/or a refusal to accept your work within school and/or to submit your work to the IB.

 You are expected to comply with all internal school deadlines. This is for your own benefit and may allow time for revising work that is of doubtful authorship.

 Once a student has ‘signed off’, thus indicating that a piece of work is authentically his/hers, there is very little, possibly no opportunity to re-submit different work, if the first submission is deemed to be plagiarized.

 You should be aware that teachers have the right to refuse to ‘sign off’ your work if they do not believe you completed the work, and if you cannot prove your ownership to their satisfaction, or the satisfaction of the IB DP Coordinator. The IB will accept the teacher’s decision in this case.

 It is the student’s responsibility, if academic dishonesty is suspected, to prove that all pieces of work are his/her own and have not been plagiarized.

Teachers:

Teachers are responsible as follows:

 To be vigilant for obvious changes in a candidate’s style of writing, for work which is too mature, too error-free or more characteristic of an experienced academic than a secondary school student.

 Subject teachers are in the best position to identify work which may not be the authentic work of the student.

 Teachers are expected to read and check candidates’ work for authenticity before submission. This refers to all internal and external DP assessments.

 Teachers are strongly encouraged to use Urkund to check major assignments. Urkund must be used for final versions of the Extended Essay, the TOK essay, and where possible, all final IAs.

 Any issues of authenticity arising from concerns about plagiarism and/or collusion before the submission of work for assessment must be decided within the school, initially by the subject teacher, and then in discussion with the IB DP Coordinator.

 If the DP Coordinator or teacher has reason to suspect that part or the whole of a candidate’s work, which counts towards the final IB Diploma grade in that subject, may not be authentic, that work must not be accepted or submitted for assessment. In such cases, the IB suggest that one of two possible courses of action may be adopted – the preference is to first deal with the issue internally.

 The candidate can be allowed one opportunity to revise and resubmit the work, which must be completed on time for the DP Coordinator to send the work to the examiner by the appropriate IB deadline.

 If there is insufficient time, an ‘F’ must be entered against the candidate’s name on the appropriate section of the screen. This will result in no grade being awarded for the subject concerned. This will mean that no Diploma is awarded.

The school may make further decisions, in line with its own disciplinary policy, which may include suspension or expulsion, in addition to, or even prior to, the suggested course of action noted above. If plagiarism is detected by a teacher or Coordinator after a candidate’s work has been accepted or submitted for assessment, the International Baccalaureate’s Curriculum and Assessment office (IBCA) must be informed.

Parents and Guardians

 Encourage your son or daughter to plan each assignment so that they can meet deadlines with ease.

 Provide support with the scheduling of their work, as your son or daughter may have many assignments to complete. Most students state that the reason they did not act honestly is related to a lack of time.

 Let your son or daughter do their own work, but show them how to research and plan their work.

 Establish a good level of communication with the school so that you understand the requirements of the Diploma Programme and what is expected of students.

 If your son or daughter is having difficulty with their work, encourage them to ask a teacher for advice.

 Discuss the extent of after school activities (including work) with your son or daughter.

The School, the Coordinator

The school makes it clear what constitutes academic honesty and an authentic piece of work through its ‘Academic Honesty Policy’.

 The coordinator introduces all Pre-IB and DP students to the Academic Honesty Policy within the first Quarter of the school year.

 Teachers must also actively use correct citing conventions when providing candidates with reference material, including PowerPoints, Google Slides, etc.

 The Librarian is always willing to provide support and assistance in terms of research, and the correct use of citations.

 Candidates will be clearly informed how misconduct will be investigated, and what the consequences are of having been found guilty of academic misconduct.

 Candidates will be advised at all times to act with integrity, and to as honestly and as accurately as possible to acknowledge the ideas and work of others.

 Candidates will be provided with the ‘Conduct of Examinations’ prior to the Diploma exams, and this will be discussed fully in classes before the Mock and final DP exams.

Academic Honesty and ATL (Approaches to Learning)

In their academic work, DP students develop research skills and study habits that are needed to demonstrate academic honesty in more formal ways than would be appropriate to expect of younger learners. DP students investigate and evaluate the usefulness of a greater variety of resources and incorporate and reference them within oral and written presentations of increasingly complex formats.
This level of rigor can present a challenge to students who certainly know right from wrong, but who may not possess the organizational and self-management skills to demonstrate clearly that their work meets a formal standard of academic honesty. All IB students understand the importance of acknowledging others because it is a central feature of the constructivist, inquirybased approach promoted in all IB programmes. In the DP, this requires the explicit teaching and learning of specific conventions accepted in a community of learners for being transparent about the use of ideas and work of others—note making, in-text citation and the preparation of a bibliography, to name but a few examples (Carroll 2012: 5–6).
Teachers, students and administration are encouraged to reflect on the work they are completing, presenting and assessing. This self-reflective approach, coupled with a school ethos which values personal and academic integrity, and constant communication between students, teachers and the Coordinator, should result in an environment where the monitoring of academic honesty is consistent, student-led and non-invasive.

Monitoring and Sanctions
Teachers retain responsibility both for guiding students in the formation of academically honest practices, and for monitoring the work they hand in to ensure it complies with IBDP regulations. To assist students and teachers in understanding the importance of developing an academically honest approach to all aspects of the Diploma Programme, internal and external sanctions are in place in order to respond consistently should issues related to academic misconduct arise. Internal sanctions are those used by Struer Statsgymnasium, and generally refer to assignments and classwork (general homework and ‘drafts’) which do not count towards the award of the final IB Diploma. External sanctions are those applied by the IB, and relate specifically to all pieces of work, usually ‘final version’ (internal assessments, final exams, TOK assessment, CAS folders, the EE…) which count towards the final IB Diploma. However, there is some overlap to be expected between the applications of these sanctions, so they should not be seen as acting in isolation from each other.

Internal Sanctions
Internal sanctions may be imposed by the school for incidences of academic misconduct relating to homework, classwork, and internal exams which do not involve internally and externally assessed final pieces of official IB examination work, and will include:

  • 1st Offence: The student is required to re-do the work and reminded of Struer Statsgymnasium’s academic honesty policy. The misconduct is noted in school records (Lectio).
  • 2nd Offence: The student is given zero for the work and a written warning is issued. This second misconduct offense is noted in school records (Lectio).
  • 3rd Offence: If a student is found guilty of a 3rd breach of academic honesty, they will receive a second written warning, and may be recommended for withdrawal.

External Sanctions
External sanctions are those assigned by the IB, or by the school, in compliance with IB regulations, and relate specifically to the perception that academic misconduct has taken place in work which counts towards the award of the final Diploma. Should such academic dishonesty be suspected in the first draft of an IA, the EE or the TOK essay, it is likely that the internal sanctions above will apply. However, if the suspected misconduct occurs at a later stage, either once work has been submitted to the IB, or when final versions of IAs are handed in with little or no time before the final submission date, misconduct investigation and sanctions will take place as detailed in the section below.

The school retains the right to apply other sanctions when dealing with misconduct internally including internal exams, tests, coursework (internal assessments) and homework procedures. When the misconduct involves official IB examination procedures, these sanctions could also be enlarged to include suspension, expulsion, or refusal to allow the student to attend the Graduation Ceremony.

Investigating academic misconduct

Investigations take place when:

  • A coordinator informs IBCA that academic misconduct may have taken place during an examination
  • An examiner suspects misconduct and provides evidence to justify his or her suspicion
  • A member of staff identifies examination material that may or may not be the authentic work of a candidate and provides evidence to justify his or her suspicion.

An investigation of misconduct detected by an examiner outside the school may take the following form:

  • The head of examinations administration will inform the DP Coordinator that a candidate is being investigated for suspected academic misconduct
  • The DP Coordinator immediately informs the Principal of Struer Statsgymnasium that a candidate is being investigated.
  • The DP Coordinator will provide IBCA with:
  • A statement from the candidate
    · A statement from the subject teacher or extended essay supervisor
    · A statement from the DP Coordinator
    · A summary of the interview with the candidate about the allegation of misconduct.
  • The investigation should take place immediately, although it can be delayed until after the last written examination taken by the candidate
  • The candidate’s parents should be informed, but this decision will be taken by the Principal and Coordinator and will depend on the age of the candidate. (The parents of a candidate who is under 18 will always be informed)
  • The planning and conduct of the investigation are left to the discretion of the DP Coordinator, but the candidate’s personal rights must be protected.
  • Those who will investigate external allegations include the Principal, the IB DP Coordinator and the subject teacher.
  • It is normal practice to interview the candidate with a relative or friend in attendance.
  • The candidate must be shown the evidence and be invited to present an explanation or defense.
  • With the candidate’s permission, a transcript of the interview may be taken and submitted to IBCA. The candidate must also be given the opportunity to provide a written statement.
  • The candidate and his/her parents have a right to see evidence, statements reports and correspondence about the case. Evidence may be withheld to protect the identity of an informant.
  • The candidate must be given a copy of the Regulations and his/her attention drawn to the articles which concern misconduct
  • The candidate must be given sufficient time to prepare a response to the allegation

An investigation of misconduct which happens during an IB Diploma exam may take the following form:

  • The candidate will be allowed to complete the exam. As little disruption as possible should take place.
  • The DP Coordinator should be immediately informed by the invigilator of his/her suspicions
  • The DP Coordinator should begin an investigation immediately after the exam has ended. This will include interviewing the candidate, and taking written statements from everyone involved, including the candidate, and the invigilator.
  • The Principal should be informed as soon as possible.
  • The candidate’s parents/guardians should be contacted – if the candidate is under 18, and with the candidate’s agreement if she/he is over 18
  • Full written statements should be submitted to the relevant section of the IB and these should be shared with the candidate and his/her parents
  • The candidate must be allowed to complete all other exams in that Diploma session · The IB will make the final decision as to whether or not there should be consequences.

An investigation of suspected or proven misconduct relating to internal assessments may take the following form:

  • The candidate is told by the teacher and the Coordinator that there are doubts about the authorship of his/her work
  • If the candidate agrees that the work is not his/her own and if time allows, then the work can be re-done – under close supervision
  • If the candidate continues to insist that the work is his/her own, the subject teacher should be asked to provide a statement explaining why he/she believes that this cannot be the case.
  • The candidate, his/her parents (if possible), the subject teacher, the Principal and the IB DP Coordinator should hold a meeting to discuss the situation fully. A record of the meeting should be kept.
  • The candidate will be asked to provide evidence that the work is his/her own – corrected drafts, work of a similar style or standard completed earlier in the subject, or a brief test on the candidate’s knowledge of the work – and the subject.
  • The subject teacher’s decision will be final, and the candidate must be aware that the school can submit a coded grade indicative of its belief that the work is not the candidate’s own when entering grades on the IB system, that this will not be questioned or investigated by the IB, and that this will result in failure of the component, subject and Diploma.
  • The school may choose to withdraw the student from his/her exam registration in the component, subject or the Diploma as a whole.

Consequences of academic misconduct (sanctions) as outlined by the IB

  • If the academic misconduct is deemed to be minimal, zero marks will be awarded for the assessment component, but a grade will still be awarded for the subject. This is referred to as ‘Academic Infringement’.
  • If a candidate is found to have plagiarized all or part of any assignment, then no grade will be awarded for the subject. This automatically means that no Diploma can be awarded.
  • Misconduct during an examination will result in no grade being awarded for the specific subject involved – which means no Diploma can be awarded.
  • If a candidate falsifies a CAS record, no Diploma will be issued until 12 months after the examination session have passed. The CAS record will need to be correctly completed.
  • If the case of academic misconduct is very serious, the candidate may not be allowed to reregister for examinations in any future session.
  • An IB Diploma may be withdrawn from a candidate at any time if misconduct is subsequently established.

 An appeal may be made to the final award committee in the light of new factual evidence, within three months of the original decision.

 

Document prepared by: Morten Jensen Updated: October 2018 Next review: September 2020 Contents based on: Academic Honesty (2009, 2011), IBO, Geneva Switzerland Academic Honesty in the Educational Context, (2014), IBO, Geneva, Switzerland Academic Honesty Policy: Copenhagen International School (September 2018)

Admission to Pre-IB and IB DP at Struer Statsgymnasium

For information about applying to Pre-IB and the IB DP at Struer Statsgymnasium, please read the information below. Application forms can be found on the school’s homepage.

Admissions principles
Choosing the right education and the right school is one of most critical decisions in a young person’s life. The admissions process at Struer Statsgymnasium is committed to ensuring that applicants and their parents receive proper advice and counselling in order for them to be able to make a confident and informed decision. As a school community, we follow an open and inclusive admissions policy, welcoming students with diverse backgrounds and a range of talents and abilities. From our perspective, the most critical factors in the admissions process are the student’s conscious choice for Struer Statsgymnasium and that we, as a school, believe that we are the right school for any one candidate. We believe that we have a big responsibility, also, in trying to ensure that applicants for admission at Struer Statsgymnasium have a reasonable chance of success in the courses we offer. To this end, our school has a set of basic prerequisites for candidates applying to our Pre-IB and IB Diploma Programmes.

Language Requirements
The general medium of instruction and working language in the Pre-IB and IB Diploma Programme is English. International students seeking admission to the school’s international branch whose first language is not English will be interviewed before admission (via e.g. Skype or WhatsApp) to ensure that their communicative skills and fluency are at a level B2 or the equivalent of a Cambridge English first or higher. Because we encourage the integration of international students within the wider school community, and Danish is the dominant lingua franca on our campus, we require that students in our Pre-IB follow classes in Danish for beginners for the duration of the school year. For further information on language requirements, please refer to our Language Policy.

Academic Requirements
Candidates for admission to Struer Statsgymnasium’s IB World School must demonstrate that they are students who embrace and embody the IB Learner Profile (see below). We expect applicants to have inquiring and open minds, to be diligent and reliable, to be good communicators, and to have an openness to learning new things. Good time-management and organizational skills are also indispensable qualities for students to be successful in the IB. In addition to these characteristics, applicants must fulfill the following criteria for admission:

Pre-IB (Pre-DP; Year 10)
 Applicants coming from the Danish Folkeskole, or other secondary schooling in Denmark would usually apply through www.optagelse.dk. The UU counsellor at your school will assist you in the procedure. Students with the Danish grade point average of six and above and who are declared “suitable” by the UU counsellor can be expected to be admitted to the Pre-IB. If an applicant does not fulfil the formal application requirements, there will be an admissions test at the school in March to determine whether the applicant will be accepted in the Pre-IB.

 Applicants coming from a non-Danish school/school system must apply through a special application form, which can be found on the school’s website. All international applicants will be interviewed before admission. All applicants who use the application form from the school’s website can send their application as a paper copy to the school or as a scan to the school’s IB coordinator. The application must also include a motivational letter and the most recent grades transcript.

Optional documents may be
 A reference letter

 Other exams or documentation of extra-curricular activities

IB Diploma Programme

Candidates for the IB Diploma Programme will have successfully completed 10 or 11 years of school (MYP 5, Pre-IB, GCSE or IGCSE or the equivalent) and have satisfactory grades in the six subjects they intend to select for the Diploma Programme. In addition to English, students must have a background (and be prepared to take a course) in one other language we offer in the DP (see our School Language Policy). They must likewise demonstrate a positive attitude and work ethic.

Students currently enrolled in our Pre-IB programme who seek admission to the Diploma Programme will be accepted without application being necessary if they pass the end of year exams. Students must also demonstrate sufficient competency in written and spoken English and obtain a grade of at least 7 (Danish grade scale) in the Pre-IB English course to be admitted to the DP. Pre-IB students will also be admitted to the DP only if they have successfully completed the mini Extended Essay.

Candidates who fail to meet the above academic requirements in one or more subjects may be required to take individual subject admissions tests administered at the school. Such applicants will be required to pass these examinations before admission can be confirmed.

Students with Special Needs
Struer Statsgymnasium’s inclusive admissions policy includes welcoming students with a variety of different abilities and special needs. Students with ‘special education needs’ are defined as those who have the intellectual capacity to meet all curriculum requirements, but who have individual learning needs and who require special arrangements to demonstrate their level of achievement. Our aim is to maintain our focus on a more diverse and inclusive IB community by enabling access to an IB education.

Admission Process
Prospective students and their families should direct enquiries to the IB Coordinator, Morten Jensen (mrj@stgym.dk) or to student counsellor Jesper Sigh (jsi@stgym.dk).

Applicants should then submit a completed application form, a short letter of motivation in English, and a school transcript (reports) from the last school year.

If applicants are in need of boarding school, the application should include a separate application for Struer Statsgymnasium’s boarding school. The application form can be found on the school’s website under (boarding school).

International students will receive a confirmation of having received the application and an interview will be scheduled with either the Diploma Programme Coordinator or the student counsellor. Interviews can take place at Struer Statsgymnasium or a Skype/WhatsApp interview can be arranged. The Diploma Programme Coordinator and/or guidance counselor will provide students and their families with detailed information about the IB Diploma Programme and boarding school life in Struer.

EU citizen
For applicants coming from an EU country, an EU residence permit must be obtained upon arrival in Denmark. The following documentation is necessary, although we would like all applicants to check https://www.nyidanmark.dk/en-GB to be sure that all information is up-to-date.

 A passport photo

 Applicant’s birth certificate (original), if applicant is under 18.

 Last three months’ pay slips from the supporting parent(s) or a print of your bank

account(s)/ bank account of your supporting parent(s).

 Parents’ passports if applicant is under 18.

 Admission letter from Struer Statsgymnasium

 If parents are divorced and applicant is under 18: Notarized documentation of divorce, and a notarized statement that both parents consent to the child studying abroad.

The above documentation must be brought in person to the Danish authorities, located in Aarhus, Denmark, upon arrival. It is advisable that applicants under 18 bring a Danish speaking helper when going to apply for the residence permit.

Non EU citizen
Non-EU citizens cannot be granted more than a one-year-visa by the Danish immigration authorities unless special circumstances are in place. Struer Statsgymnasium does not accept applicants who cannot complete the full 2-year IB Diploma in Denmark, due to visa restrictions.

Document prepared by: Morten Jensen
Updated: August 2018

The IB Diploma Programme The International Baccalaureate’s Mission Statement The International Baccalaureate aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect. To this end the organization works with schools, governments and international organizations to develop challenging programmes of international education and rigorous assessment. These programmes encourage students across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences, can also be right. The Learner Profile Inquirers We nurture our curiosity, developing skills for inquiry and research. We know how to learn independently and with others. We learn with enthusiasm and sustain our love of learning throughout life. Knowledgeable We develop and use conceptual understanding, exploring knowledge across a range of disciplines. We engage with issues and ideas that have local and global significance. Thinkers We use critical and creative thinking skills to analyse and take responsible action on complex problems. We exercise initiative in making reasoned, ethical decisions. Communicators We express ourselves confidently and creatively in more than one language and in many ways. We collaborate effectively, listening carefully to the perspectives of other individuals and groups. Principled We act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness and justice, and with respect for the dignity and rights of people everywhere. We take responsibility for our actions and their consequences. Open-minded We critically appreciate our own cultures and personal histories, as well as the values and traditions of others. We seek and evaluate a range of points of view, and we are willing to grow from the experience. Caring We show empathy, compassion, and respect. We have a commitment to service, and we act to make a positive difference in the lives of others and in the world around us. Risk-takers We approach uncertainty with forethought and determination; we work independently and cooperatively to explore new ideas and innovative strategies. We are resourceful and resilient in the face of challenge and change. Balanced We understand the importance of balancing different aspects of our lives – intellectual, physical and emotional – to achieve well-being for ourselves and others. We recognize our interdependence with other people and with the world in which we live. Reflective We thoughtfully consider the world and our own ideas and experience. We work to understand our strengths and weaknesses in order to support our learning and personal development. Assessment philosophy Assessment is integral to all teaching and learning. It provides learners and teachers with feedback to revise performance and improve teaching and learning. Assessment enables the school to evaluate and monitor the effectiveness of its programmes and provides direction for teachers, learners, parents, administration and overall school development. For assessment to be effective, it should • Be based on clear, known and understood assessment criteria
  • Involve self-assessment and reflection on the part of the learner
  • Provide timely, direct, specific and contextualized feedback to teachers, learners and parents
  • Be integrated into all stages of the learning process
  • Be supportive and motivating
  • Place students at the centre of teaching and learning
Assessment practices and strategies Struer Statsgymnasium operates the following practices: Pre-assessment If relevant, teachers assess learners’ prior knowledge and experience in an appropriate way before beginning a new unit of work or learning experience. Formative Assessment On-going and regular assessment will take place during the teaching and learning process using a variety of methods to inform teachers and learners about the progress of learning.
  • Formative assessment and learning are directly linked and provide feedback to teachers and learners. It is responsive to learner needs and informs teaching practice.
  • Formative assessment engages students actively in the process of learning. Students should learn to self-assess, peer-assess, and improve their performance with the aid of each teacher’s feedback.
  • Formative assessment provides students with opportunities to learn new skills and to achieve better results while taking risks and not being afraid to make mistakes as they are not working towards the achievement of grades.
  • Formative assessment can for instance be draft assignments, oral presentations, questioning, discussion, visual representations and quizzes.
Summative Assessment Summative assessment often takes place at the end of a teaching and learning process or experience and is planned for in advance.
  • The assessment is designed so that learners can demonstrate their knowledge and understanding in authentic tasks and apply their skills. The tasks involved are usually modelled on those mandated by the IB and graded in accordance with IB criteria. These grades count towards semester grades.
  • Summative assessments can take a variety of forms (including for example tests, mock examinations, lab reports, oral and visual presentations, essays, written assignments, projects, oral examinations.
Self-assessment Reflection and self-assessment are fundamental elements of the assessment process • Self-assessment is useful both during a learning experience, in enabling the learner to set goals and strategies for personal development, and at the end of the learning experience, in helping the learner to take increasing responsibility for their own learning.
  • Self-assessment may be particularly relevant at the end of year one and during year two when students must examine their strengths and weaknesses in light of the coming exams. This can be done in talks with their subject teacher, counsellor and/or IB coordinator.
Peer assessment
  • Peer assessment may happen as part of the teaching and learning process. Examples of peer assessment in the Diploma Programme will be based on clear criteria given by the teacher and often mediated by the teacher. This will often take place in smaller groups during lessons, and the format can be oral feedback on written work, on class presentations, on drafts for written work (processual writing strategies). This is very much in line with the learner profile attributes of open-mindedness, communication and critical thinking.
Assessment Strategies Observation At Struer Statsgymnasium all learners are observed regularly, with the teacher noting the performance of the individual, the group and the whole class. Observations include how groups work and the various roles of participants within the groups. Task Specific Rubrics Assessment criteria and learning outcomes are established and published to the learners clearly in advance of an assessment. Moderation Moderation refers to the checking and unifying of assessment standards. Internal moderation takes place in the DP Programme where this is possible. Where there is only one teacher of a subject, internal moderation is not possible within the subject, but subject group teachers meet to discuss the criteria that apply for the subject group. E.g. A language B teacher will find it useful to discuss moderation with a language B teacher of a different language. Criterion Referencing All assessment is criterion referenced. Assessment in the Diploma Programme is guided by the lB and the guidelines and practices are outlined in the IB document Diploma Programme Assessment Principles and Practices (lBO 2010/2004). The IB describes assessment of the Diploma Programme as ‘high-stakes, criterion-related performance assessment.’ It is based on the following aims:
  • DP assessment should support the curricular and philosophical goals of the programme through the encouragement of good classroom practice and appropriate student learning.
  • The published results of DP assessment (that is, subject grades) must have a sufficiently high level of reliability, appropriate to a high-stakes university entrance qualification.
  • DP assessment must reflect the international mindedness of the programme wherever possible, must avoid cultural bias, and must make appropriate allowance for students working in their second language.
  • DP assessment must pay appropriate attention to the higher-order cognitive skills (synthesis, reflection, evaluation, critical thinking) as well as the more fundamental cognitive skills (knowledge, understanding and application).
  • Assessment for each subject must include a suitable range of tasks and instruments/components that ensure all objectives for the subject are assessed.
  • The principal means of assessing student achievement and determining subject grades should be the professional judgment of experienced senior examiners, supported by statistical information.
Some key features of Diploma Programme assessment include the following
  • An emphasis on criterion-related (as opposed to norm-referenced) assessment. This method of assessment judges students’ work in relation to identified levels of attainment, rather than in relation to the work of other students.
  • A distinction between formal IB assessment and the supporting formative processes that schools need to develop for themselves.
  • Valuing the most accurate demonstration of student performance, rather than just averaging attainment grades over a reporting period.
  • Examining student understanding at the end of the course, based on the whole course and not just aspects of it. Students must be able to recall, adapt and apply knowledge and skills to new questions and contexts.
Assessments are based upon evaluating course aims and objectives and, therefore, effective teaching to the course requirements also ensures effective teaching to the examination and other formal assessment requirements. Students need to understand what the assessment expectations, standards and practices are and these are therefore all introduced early, naturally in instruction as well as class and homework activities. Teachers are responsible for designing and providing formative assessment structures and practices that help students to improve their understanding of what constitutes excellence and where their own work stands in relation to this. Formative assessment is also important for the teacher, as it provides detailed feedback on the nature of the students’ strengths and limitations. The emphasis here—a key component of learning how to learn—is on making the student a better judge of their own performance and then helping them to develop strategies to improve. Formative assessment focuses on assessment as an essential learning process. Assessment instruments primarily designed for formal assessment at the end of the course are also adapted and used formatively as part of the learning process. Formal assessment in the Diploma Programme is defined by the IB as “all those assessment instruments that are used to contribute to the final qualification”. These instruments include some multiple-choice tests for some of the Group 4 subjects, examination papers for most subjects, taken at the end of the two-year course, as well as a variety of other tasks (essays, research papers, written tasks, oral interviews, scientific and mathematical investigations and fieldwork projects) spread over different subjects and completed by students at various times under various conditions during their course. Some of these assessment instruments are used formatively during the course, for internal assessment purposes, as well as summative at the end. Assessment Criteria Subject teachers present the assessment criteria of their subject early in the programme. Assessment tasks are marked according to these criteria so that students, teachers and parents are clear about the progress of the learner. Grades, reporting and recording The IB Grading Scale is as follows 7: Excellent 6: Very Good 5: Good 4: Satisfactory 3: Mediocre 2: Poor 1: Very Poor Grade 1 is failing grade The TOK course and the Extended Essay are graded according to the following scale A: Excellent B: Good C: Satisfactory D: Mediocre E: Elementary (failing grade) N: No grade In order to achieve a final score for the Diploma, the numeric grades from the six subjects are added together. EE and TOK grades are converted into 1, 2 or 3 points (using the matrix below) and added to the subject score to achieve a final result out of 45. 24 points (and the meeting of a number of conditions, see the Grade Folder on the school’s homepage) are required in order to ‘pass’ the Diploma.
Extended essay Theory of knowledge
Grade A Grade B Grade C Grade D Grade E No grade N
Grade A 3 3 2 2 Failing condition Failing condition
Grade B 3 2 2 1 Failing condition Failing condition
Grade C 2 2 1 0 Failing condition Failing condition
Grade D 2 1 0 0 Failing condition Failing condition
Grade E Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition
No grade N Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition
Predicted Grades Final Diploma Programme grades for each student are predicted twice in DP2, for two separate purposes. Between October and February, teachers predict grades on an individual basis to assist with student applications for university. Students are informed of their total predicted grade, and, where necessary, (usually for entrance to UK universities), of individual subject predicted grades. Teachers can change these predicted grades following the outcome of the mock examinations in February. In March, teachers again predict grades for students, in all subjects, including TOK and the EE, this time in response to an IB requirement to provide such grades prior to the final exams. For studies in Denmark the predicted grades are not required. Students can apply for further education in Denmark without grades and the grades will be reported to the institutions either through IB results service if the students inform the IB coordinator of which institutions they have applied to, or by the students themselves when the results are released in July. Grade Conversion and Danish Universities The IB Diploma is recognized as an entrance qualification for admission to all the higher education institutions in Denmark, provided that the applicants have either passed Danish (as Danish A (HL or SL) or Danish B (HL)) in their IBDP examination or passed a required language test in Danish. The 2018 Conversion Table below details the manner in which IB Diploma points are converted to equate with the Danish grading system when determining eligibility to enter Danish universities. If students do not pass the Diploma, but achieve at least 3 points in each of the six subjects (EE, CAS and TOK not relevant), they will still have a qualification equivalent of the Danish HF exam, giving access to vocational colleges [professionshøjskoler] and the like, but not university level courses.  
Total points IB Danish grades
18 2.4
19 2.7
20 3.0
21 3.3
22 3.6
23 4.0
24 4.4
25 4.7
26 5.2
27 5.6
28 6.0
29 6.5
30 6.9
31 7.3
32 7.8
33 8.3
34 8.6
35 9.0
36 9.4
37  9.8
38 10.2
39 10.5
40 10.8
41 11.1
42 11.3
43 11.6
44 11.9
45 12.7
  Semester grades and final grades, the IB Diploma and the DP Course Result Achievement grades on student reports are given in the form of number grades, 1 – 7 (7 being the best), and are, therefore, reflective of the IB grading scale, allowing students and parents to determine how well students are doing when measured against IB criteria in each subject. Semester grades and yearly grades are the teacher’s estimate of how well each student has mastered the essentials of the subject. The assessment instruments used to obtain the grade will vary from subject to subject. Depending on the course, the grade may be based on homework, quizzes, tests, laboratory reports, projects, papers, oral presentations, group work and participation in class. The students will receive semester grades twice a year, in November and February/March. In DP1, students will also receive an end-of-year grade. These grades will be an overall assessment, including class work, written assignments, group work, field work, presentations, tests, Internal Assessment, mock exams and other types of subject work that the teachers find relevant. Sometimes the grades will be accompanied by a written comment. Total points for each student in DP1 and DP2 following each relevant semester grade report and yearly grade report are calculated by the DP Coordinator and used in collaboration with subject teachers and counsellors as a means of tracking student progress and supporting students who may be facing academic or personal challenges. Term grades, end of year grades and mock exam grades will be available in lectio, and no paper version will be sent to parents and students. It is the responsibility of students and parents to check the grades once available, and students should give parents their access information to the online platform ‘lectio’ where attendance and grades are registered. In cases when a student is performing badly and in particular if there is a risk that the student will not be allowed to be promoted to year 2 or is in risk of failing a subject, the student and parents (if the student is under 18) will be contacted directly, in writing. A general guideline is that in order to be promoted from DP1 to DP2, end of year grades as well as mock exam grades from June must suggest that the student can achieve a full IB Diploma by the end of DP2. Alternatively, students wishing to continue their studies in Denmark must be able to achieve at least 3 in all subjects, permitting them to apply for a number of schools of further education, but not universities. However, at Struer Statsgymnasium we always have individual talks with students, with whom we have a concern, to clarify each individual student’s plan of action. The Diploma and the DP Course Result In some cases students, after having been informed that it is highly probable that they will fail in one or two subjects or that their accumulated grades are likely to be below 24, will be allowed to continue through the exams, not receiving an IB Diploma, but the DP Course Result, showing the individual subjects and grades. The DP Course Result is not comparable to the IB Diploma and generally does not give access to higher education. However, some institutions may enroll students with Course Results only, depending on the individual subject grades and level. These requirements are varying from nation to nation and school to school. In a Danish context, it is possible to move on into some higher education programmes (not university), known as e.g. Professionshøjskoler and Erhvervsakademier, with less than a full diploma. The requirement here is at least 3 points in all subjects and a minimum of 18 points in total. Whether or not grades in the 18-23 band give access to specific institutions depends on their general (Grade Point Average, if any) and specific (subjects, levels) access requirements. If a student does not intend to continue their further education in Denmark, it is their own responsibility to find out whether a DP Course Result is adequate in terms of accessing programmes of further education. The school’s counselor for further education abroad (currently the IB coordinator) will of course be of assistance if the student so wishes. The rules of the Danish Ministry of Education concerning students with DP Course Results can be read here (in Danish): http://bachelor.au.dk/fileadmin/www.bachelorguide.au.dk/Optagelse/Optagelse_af_IBelever_og_supplering_af_Diploma_Programme__DP__Course_Re.._.pdf Recording of grades Records of total grades and, where necessary, the actions taken are maintained by the DP Coordinator across the two years of the Diploma Programme. Records of predicted grades are maintained by the student counsellor and the DP Coordinator. An analysis of predicted versus actual total grades is also maintained by the DP Coordinator. The final DP score achieved by each student is noted on the Diploma Results Document issued by the IB. This, alongside the IB Diploma is copied and placed in individual student files as a record of achievement. Subject and component grades for each student alongside school statistics, etc., going back a number of years, are recorded on IBIS (the IB’s information system) and can be accessed by the DP Coordinator. Overall Diploma Programme results (pass rate, average points, best score…) are provided each year by the IB and a record of this assessment outcome is maintained by the DP Coordinator and updated annually on the school website. Internal and external assessment in the The Diploma Programme Formal assessment in the Diploma Programme is defined as assessment directly contributing to the final qualification. Because of the high stakes’ nature of this assessment process, determining students’ possible pathways to further education, it is essential that teachers and students fully understand how formal assessment is conducted. Most formal assessment is external and includes examinations or work completed during the course and then sent to an external examiner. Some formal assessment is internal, requiring the teacher to mark the work before it is moderated by an external moderator. In order to ensure that the internal and external assessment tasks mentioned above are appropriately and effectively distributed across the two-year Diploma Programme as a means of reducing student stress, a calendar of internal assessment deadlines is created each year by the DP Coordinator and agreed to by all DP teaching staff. This calendar will be available electronically and the students will be informed about the upcoming deadlines regularly by teachers and the IB coordinator. Assessment and Inclusion Students with ‘special education needs’ are defined as those who have the intellectual capacity to meet all curriculum requirements, but who have individual learning needs and who require special arrangements to demonstrate their level of achievement. Therefore, where standard assessment conditions could put candidates with special educational needs at a disadvantage by preventing them from demonstrating their level of attainment, special arrangements may be authorized by the IB. This approach applies to students with learning difficulties, alongside students affected by temporary, long-term or permanent disability or illness. Some of the special arrangements related to assessment that may be authorized by the IB are based on the following principles:
  • The IB must ensure that a grade awarded to a candidate in any subject is not a misleading description of that candidate’s level of attainment, so the same standards of assessment are applied to all candidates, regardless of whether or not they have special needs.
  • Special arrangements are intended to reduce the adverse effects of a candidate’s special needs when demonstrating his or her level of attainment. The special arrangements requested for a candidate must not give that candidate an advantage in any assessment component.
  • The special arrangements described in this document are intended for candidates with the intellectual capacity to meet all assessment requirements leading to the award of the diploma or courses results.
Full details of assessment arrangements for students with special education needs can be found in the school’s Special Educational Needs Policy. Assessment and Academic Honesty Struer Statsgymnasium places great value on the ethical qualities of personal integrity and academic honesty. Academic honesty is expected of all members of the school community; students, faculty, administration and parents. Students are expected to abide by the school’s Academic Honesty Policy when completing any and all pieces of assessment work – the overriding principles of which are outlined below:
  • All work produced by Diploma Programme students is their own, authentic work
  • All such authentic work has the ideas and words of others fully acknowledged
  • Students understand and obey the rules relating to proper conduct of examinations
  • Students understand the difference between collaboration and collusion, and that it is unacceptable to present work arrived at through a process of collusion
  • The policy refers to all assignments set and completed in school or at home, ranging from basic pieces of homework to formal assessments required by the IB
Document prepared by: Morten Jensen Updated: October 2018 – Next review: September 2020 Contents based on: Diploma Programme Assessment: Principles and Practices, (2010/2004), IBO, Cardiff Guidelines for developing a school assessment policy in the Diploma Programme, (2010), IBO, Cardiff IB Assessment Policy: Goetheschule Essen (2011) Walvoord, Barbara E., (2010), Assessment Clear and Simple: A Practical Guide for Institutions, Departments and General Education. San Francisco, Jossey Bass Assessment Philosophy and Practice Viborg Katedralskole Assessment Philosophy and Practice Copenhagen International School

With this language policy we would like to outline how we can help our pre-IB and IB students achieve individual and common language goals at Struer Statsgymnasium. We believe that language awareness is basic for intercultural understanding and respect.

Diversity. We are aware of and value our students’ language and cultural diversity. Students from the same language background are welcome to speak their own language outside of the classroom where all members of the group share the language. In all other situations, the language of communication must be English.

Language of instruction. The language of instruction is English in all classes except for the Danish classes. Where possible in language classes (Spanish and German) the instruction language may also be the target language (supplemented by English when necessary).  We therefore recognize that all teachers are, in practice not only subject teachers, but also language teachers.

English in the classroom. We always speak English in the classrooms. We also encourage students to speak English outside the classroom and in the breaks. Students may speak their mother tongue outside school, unless they are together with others who do not understand that language. We never use language to exclude others.

First language. All students study their first language. We offer classes in Danish A Literature and English A Language and Literature. Other languages can be studied as self-taught and with the help of a supervisor. 

Language A Literature self-taught. The self-taught supervisor is a Language A teacher and can therefore guide students competently in the syllabus outlined in the subject guide. The school can help the students to establish contact with other IB students and teachers of the language in question.

Self-taught students participate in the written mock exams. The school provides a small library for languages other than Danish and English.

Second language. All students learn at least one language in addition to their mother tongue. The school offers several languages ranging from ab initio to higher level languages. Current options in group 2 include English B HL, Danish B HL, Spanish a.i. SL, German SL.

Danish as a second language. The school facilitates Danish as a second language classes by finding qualified teachers for interested students. There is ample opportunity of interacting and communicating with Danish students from our other lines of education on activity days, introduction days, school parties, Friday cafés, CAS days, boarding school activities etc.

Morning assemblies. The main part of our morning assemblies is conducted in Danish, as we are a Danish school with an IB section. Contributions by IB students and teachers take place in English. We make sure that Danish students translate for those students who do not understand Danish. 

CAS. Students are encouraged to help each other in the languages. Thus native speakers offer language courses for small groups of learners of e.g. Danish or Spanish. Single students also help younger students with their language skills at local schools and in a programme by the Red Cross.

Library. The school library cooperates with the public library in Struer. The public library specializes in personal consultations with students and are able to help with information on EE and IA-related materials. The school’s library caters for special languages to support our Language A self-taught students.

Document prepared by: Morten Jensen
Updated: August 2018

Principles
Our aim is to maintain our focus on a more diverse and inclusive IB community by enabling access for all to an IB education.
The International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP) at Struer Statsgymnasium supports the principle of inclusion, so that students with special educational needs can demonstrate their ability under conditions that are as fair as possible. Students with ‘special education needs’ are defined as those who have the intellectual capacity to meet all curriculum requirements, but who have individual learning challenges that require special arrangements to demonstrate their level of achievement.
Admission of candidates with diagnosed Special Educational Needs.

 Before accepting a student with special educational needs as a candidate for Pre-IB and the Diploma Programme, the coordinator and student counselor must be satisfied that the candidate has the intellectual capacity to meet all requirements.
 Careful consideration must be given to a candidate’s choice of subjects, as some subjects may pose particular difficulties for a candidate with special needs.
 A support programme for the candidate must be agreed with the candidate and supporting agencies. If relevant, teachers must be consulted at an early stage in the candidate’s study of the programme.
 The coordinator is responsible for collating the necessary documentation from support agencies and the IBO regarding requests for special assessment arrangements.

Responsibilities
On a daily basis, the student counsellor is responsible for coordinating support for candidates with special educational needs. This may include meeting and coordinating with:

 parents
 teachers
 the school psychologist
 other medical agencies
 Youth counsellors for mentor support
 reading support counselors
 teacher/student mentors
 applications for support packages (e.g. IT support)
 providing information and relevant documentation to the IB coordinator to support applications for special assessment arrangements.

Definitions of special needs
At Struer Statsgymnasium we distinguish between 4 broad categories of special educational needs:

Communication and interaction
This includes students with speech and language delay, impairments or disorders, specific learning difficulties such as dyslexia and dyscalculia, hearing impairment, and those who demonstrate features along the autistic spectrum.

Cognition and Learning
This includes students who, as a result of physical or mental challenges, demonstrate features of moderate, severe or profound learning difficulties.

Social, mental and emotional health
This includes students who may be withdrawn or isolated, disruptive or disturbing, or those who are either hyperactive or lack concentration
Sensory and/or physical needs. This includes students with sensory, multi-sensory and physical difficulties. (It is important to note that, while all parties will strive to accommodate the special educational needs of the candidate, it is also necessary to keep in mind what we cannot do and determine whether the school can effectively meet the needs of an individual to the best possible standard available. If it is determined that we cannot, we strive to help the student find and access the institution best suited to their unique needs).

Practice
At Struer Statsgymnasium there is a close cooperation between the IB Coordinator, the student counsellors and the class teachers. Often the school knows in advance whether or not a student will have specific special educational needs. Sometimes, however, these needs are not seen or known of when the student begins their education at the school.

Most frequently, the school is informed about special needs in the candidate’s application to the school. In that case, student counsellors will meet before the beginning of the school year, sometimes with the applicant and their parent/guardian, to plan the actions to be taken in the coming school year. At other times, special needs are not known or informed to the school before the beginning of the school year. In that case, special needs may be detected by teachers or student counsellors in their intro talks with the students. If a student is found to have special educational needs, different means of action may be offered:

Student counselling:
The student counsellors may be able to work with the student on a one-toone basis and assist the student in achieving the means to develop academically, socially or emotionally.

Coaching:
The school’s three coaches work with students who are in need of extra attention. They are trained to work with students who face academic, social and/or emotional difficulties due to one of the four above-mentioned special educational needs.

Psychologist:
Struer Statsgymnasium has an arrangement with a psychologist who comes to the school once a week. Students may have up to five consultations per school year that are paid by the school.

Reading counsellor:
The school has the means to check students for dyslexia and dyscalculia based on teachers’ response. The school offers special equipment (computers and programs etc.) to assist in student assessment.

Homework cafes:
Struer Statsgymnasium offers students help with homework after classes. Twice a week a teacher is available for consultation in specific subjects.

The above-mentioned measures have been institutionalized over the past 7-8 years. The school sees it as a means to help students stick with and finish their education.

Types of special assessment in the IB Diploma Programme

Additional time:
May be authorized for written examinations and for certain activities connected to internal assessment. Usually 25% more time is allowed for the candidate.

Rest periods:
A candidate may be allowed supervised rest time, during which the candidate is not allowed to work on the examination.

Information and communication technology:
Candidates may be allowed to use a computer to respond to a written exam. Only technology allowed by the IB may be used in any one particular written exam.

Scribes:
A scribe is a person who writes down the dictated response of a candidate for external and/or internal assessments/exams if the candidate is unable to provide a response by hand or by computer.

Readers:
A reader may read the examination paper and the candidate’s response out loud. The reader must not explain or help in responding to the question/exam.

Communicators:
For hearing impaired students a communicator is able to convey information through the use of lip-speaking, finger-spelling or sign language and may be used during examinations.

Prompters:
For candidates with neurological or cognitive disabilities resulting in a severe attention problem, prompters can ensure that a candidate is paying attention to the examination.

Modifications to examination papers:
For candidates with visual or hearing issues, modifications can be made to examination papers (braille, special print etc.).
Audio recordings of examination papers:

The IB may provide an examination paper on a CD but is a limited service and only for exams with no visual material (illustrations, diagrams, tables or sketch maps).

Audio recordings of responses to examination papers:
If a candidate is unable to make a handwritten or word processed response to an exam question (and a scribe is not a viable alternative), a candidate may be allowed to give an audio recorded response to an exam question.

Transcription:
Transcription is justified when a candidate with a specific learning issue, or a physical disability, has very poor handwriting skills and cannot use a computer. Transcription is not available to candidates with poor handwriting for whom some form of special need cannot be diagnosed.

Alternative venues for examinations:
The IB may authorize a candidate to take an exam at home or in hospital if the candidate is too ill to attend school, but only if medical advice supports this decision.

Extensions to deadlines:
In cases of illness or accident that prevents a candidate from completing work in time for the coordinator to submit the work to the extended time may be authorized.

Assistance with practical work:
For candidates with a physical disability the IB may authorize the candidate to have assistance with practical work (often confined to the requirements of internal assessment).

The IB coordinator and student counsellors at Struer Statsgymnasium must be contacted if any adverse situation should arise during the course of the education. That way the IB coordinator will be able to contact the IB for guidance.

Document prepared by: Morten Jensen
Updated: August 2018
Resources: Candidates with Special Assessment Needs, International Baccalaureate Organization
Cardiff: IBO (2009/2011)